Photo Blog: Uros Floating Islands – Lake Titicaca – Peru

In this incredible phot blog, we take you to the Floating Islands of Uros, on Lake Titcaca in Peru. Here you see the indiginous people who live with no government, no taxes, no crime and no electricity except for a small amount of solar. They build their homes on floating reeds which they must be rebuilt every 8 years. They have two simple philosophies which they live by –

Today is for me and tomorrow morning is for you

Don’t lie, don’t steal and don’t be lazy

The Island chief and his wife row, row row the boat

The Island chief and his wife row, row row the boat

We took an over night trip which stopped off at three Islands. Uros was the first and was an amazing revelation. Seeing people who live on a set of floating homes in a lake is inspiring. They live off tourism and not much else. They live in a worls which is almost alien to what most people on the planet know.

The fiersome heads of the boats

The fiersome heads of the boats

Meeting these people is humbling. Their lives are simple and easy. While being so removed from civilization takes time to adjust to, after a short bit you begin to feel that angst and stress float away. You honestly forget what is going on in the world and feel the power of this area.

Johnny having a laugh as a local kid looks to the sky

Johnny having a laugh as a local kid looks to the sky

The colour of the people here is matched by the sense of serenity you feel. The Lake is known to be the third most powerful natural chakra on the planet. While understanding these types of spiritual phenomenon is beyond some people, you experience a calm and soft silence while you are here.

The Island women and children welcome us to their homes

The Island women and children welcome us to their homes

There are many ways to make a living in the world. But chosing to live here would limit your opportunities. While they do rely on tourism for their cash flow, you do get the feeling that they could exist just as well without it. As they get used to more and more people coming to visit, you hope they don’t sell out completely. Each little Island has a chief who looks after the financial staus of his mini tribe. The little extras they earn helps towards paying for the health of their kids.

The amazing boats the Islanders use to go from house to house

The amazing boats the Islanders use to go from house to house

As we left the Islanders we did get to see some incredibly remote homes. Families living in places which are literally houses builtg on floating reeds, far from the other little mini floating villages. They have islands specifically for bathrooms, where you must get a boat over to to do your business.  A marvellous use of the eco-system.

One of many homes on the floating Islands of Uros

One of many homes on the floating Islands of Uros

You feel like you are going back in time here. While they put on a show and sing a song or two and do a little dance, the simple facts are that these people live as people did hundreds of years ago. Not much changes. There is no traffic, no noise, no electricity poles and no busy mayhem. It is a fine way to live and it is worth visiting simply to see how some alternative types can live.

A toll booth on the way into the floating Islands of Uros

A toll booth on the way into the floating Islands of Uros

Leaving here we journeyed on to Amantani Island where we had a great experience too. But this group, living as they do, in little shacks and huts in the middle of a lake, on Islands which float and sink after a few years, are a real sight to behold. It is surely a must see place to contrast the machine of civilization that charges on around the rest of the globe.

The Islands of Uros away in the distance

The Islands of Uros away in the distance

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Post By Serena Star Leonard

Serena Star-Leonard is a business coach, writer and blogger travelling around the world for 3.5 years and counting. As well as capturing stories of inspiring people who are making a difference to their communities, her passion is to help people find a way to do the things they love for a living.

Website: → How to Retire in 12 Months

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